A miniature world can be as fanciful or as factual as you like. In the section Dollhouses for dollhouses you will find some homes that are very like those humans live in, but only two or three inches high.  You will also find houses that look more like miniature dollhouses than "real" houses, perhaps a little crudely made by a parent, perhaps much worn or long abandoned. Hidden habitats are more unusual dwellings, and may house mice or teddy bears--or hidden inhabitants of a more unusual kind.  All these dwellings have furnishings which are available separately, and which can also be bought in roombox scenes.

Many of these items are also available as kits, and there's a section with tips and techniques for those who are interested in working in smaller scales.  This section includes projects with very detailed instructions, and requiring no special materials. Cllick
here
for these "help for beginners" pages.
Most of the miniatures I make are in the scale of the smaller girl, 1/12 of 1/12, which is 1/144 scale. In this picture the "big" girl is about 4 inches high, and the tiny one about 1/12 that size (1/12 of 4" =1/3"). The 1/144 scale miniatures can be displayed on their own, or integrated into a scene in "normal," 1/12 scale.  You can think of them as miniature versions of Borrowers, or Lilliputians, or fairies, or toys

I call some of them Lostlings: they are the ones that started life on my workdesk but then jumped off and disappeared.  They now live in a special world they have built to suit their own fancies.
Smaller and smaller
I'm often asked why I make such small things. It's partly for the extra challenge, but also because the idea of miniatures within miniatures has special appeal for me.  As you look at this picture, you notice worlds in three different scales.  Beneath the pansies a little girl in blue has just discovered a littler girl in blue.
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Most of the miniatures I make are in the scale of the smaller girl, 1/12 of 1/12, which is 1/144 scale. In this picture the "big" girl is about 4 inches high, and the tiny one about 1/12 that size (1/12 of 4" =1/3"). The 1/144 scale miniatures can be displayed on their own, or integrated into a scene in "normal," 1/12 scale.  You can think of them as miniature versions of Borrowers, or Lilliputians, or fairies, or toys

I call some of them Lostlings: they are the ones that started life on my workdesk but then jumped off and disappeared.  They now live in a special world they have built to suit their own fancies.
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Toys in Miniature: Frances Armstrong
A miniature world can be as fanciful or as factual as you like. In the section Dollhouses for dollhouses you will find some homes that are very like those humans live in, but only two or three inches high.  You will also find houses that look more like miniature dollhouses than "real" houses, perhaps a little crudely made by a parent, perhaps much worn or long abandoned. Hidden habitats are more unusual dwellings, and may house mice or teddy bears--or hidden inhabitants of a more unusual kind.  All these dwellings have furnishings which are available separately, and which can also be bought in roombox scenes.

Many of these items are also available as kits, and there's a section with tips and techniques for those who are interested in working in smaller scales.  This section includes projects with very detailed instructions, and requiring no special materials. Cllick
here
for these "help for beginners" pages.
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For more about the fascination of the miniature, click here.
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This page was last updated on: May 17, 2010